Sunburn Remedies
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Sunburn
Herbal & Home Remedies Herbal Remedies Home Remedies

Aloe VeraCaution! You may have sun poisoning if you experience chills, fever, or get blisters or a rash. See your physician!

Sunburn is a kind of radiation damage done by the sun. It's by far the most common form of radiation damage. While most people know radiation is dangerous, they voluntarily expose themselves to the harmful ultraviolet (UV) light of the sun on a regular basis.

Radiation can provoke cancer, and the popularity of sunbathing has brought a steady climb in new cases of skin cancer and actinic keratosis, a precursor to skin cancer. Actinic keratosis and all types of skin cancer, particularly non-melanoma types (basal and squamous cell cancer), are directly linked to sun exposure. Exposure in early life is especially relevant. Many people get the bulk of their sun exposure during childhood, and it's been shown that even one childhood sunburn increases the risk of developing skin cancer later in life. However, sunburn is not required to damage skin. A tan is also clear evidence of UV skin damage.

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Symptoms

Sunburn results in painful, reddened skin. Severe sunburn may produce swelling and blisters. Symptoms may begin as soon as one hour after exposure and typically reach their peak after one day. Some severely sunburned people develop a fever, chills, weakness and on rare occasions go into shock.

Several days after sunburn, people with naturally air skin may have peeling in the burned areas, usually accompanied by itching. The peeled areas are even more sensitive to sunburn for several weeks. People who have had severe sunburns when young are at a greater risk of skin cancers in later years, than if they had not had long-term sun exposure.

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Causes

 

Sunburn is caused by excessive exposure to the sun or other ultraviolet light source. Sunburn occurs because the body is unable to make enough melanin (protective pigment in the skin) to protect the skin.

Sunburn may occur in less than 15 minutes of sun exposure for light-skinned persons while it may take hours for a dark-skinned person to develop a sunburn. Unfortunately, the symptoms of sunburn do not begin until 2 to 4 hours after the sun's damage has been done.

The peak reaction of redness, pain, and swelling is not seen for 24 hours. Minor sunburn is a first-degree burn which turns the skin pink or red. Prolonged sun exposure can cause blistering and a second-degree burn. Sunburn never causes a third-degree burn or scarring.

Repeated sun exposure and suntans cause premature aging of the skin (wrinkling, sagging, and brown sunspots). Repeated sunburns increase the risk of skin cancer in the damaged area. Each blistering sunburn doubles the risk of developing malignant melanoma, which is the most serious type of skin cancer.

Sunburn is literally a burn on your skin. It is a burn from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The consequence of this burn is inflammation of the skin. Injury can start within 30 minutes of exposure

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Home Remedies

Apple cider vinegar Apply apple cider vinegar to the burn with a cottonball, or make a cooling compress for a large area to relieve the pain. Keep the skin moistened. This remedy will prevent blistering and peeling.

Aspirin Aspirin kills the pain and reduces inflammation and redness of a sunburn. It short-circuits the whole sunburn process. It must be taken within 24 hours of getting sunburned. Aspirin is preferable to ibuprofen or acetaminophen because it is less stressful on the liver and kidneys.

Baking soda Dissolve some baking soda in water and make a compress using a clean cloth. Another remedy is to add 1/2 cup of baking soda to a tepid bath and soak. Instead of drying the affected area with a towel, let it air dry. Baking soda is cooling and will help the skin retain moisture.

Cucumber Rub sunburned area with fresh cucumber slices. They are very cool and will soothe the area.

Ice Apply ice or cold water to the burned area. This will stop the burning process and cool the skin.

Lemon water Mix the juice of three lemons into two cups of cold water and sponge on the sunburn. The lemon will cool the burn, act as a disinfectant, and will promote healing of the skin.

Shower Take a warm shower to draw out the heat of your sunburn. The warm water will increase circulation to the area while hydrating it, thereby speeding the healing process.

If you have suggestions or know of a proven home remedy add it here in the comment area.

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Herbal Remedies

Aloe Vera Take as many leaves as necessary from an aloe plant; refrigerate; peel off top layer of leaves; apply the side of the leaf with flesh exposed directly to the sunburn. Other remedies use aloe vera juice: for mild to medium sunburn, keep the affected area moist with aloe vera juice. Repeat frequently. This will reduce the pain and the amount of peeling. Aloe vera ointment works well, too, as it contains oil and will not evaporate. For a severe sunburn, keep the area moist at all times with aloe vera juice. Since aloe vera is an astringent, you may want to use aloe vera ointment or some sort of oil, such as olive or baby. Aloe is very effective in relieving pain and inflammation.

Peppermint Apply peppermint oil to the sunburned skin. You can also make a mild peppermint infusion and use it as a wash to cool the sunburn.

If you have suggestions or know of a proven herbal remedy add it here in the comment area.

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Wellness Program

Avoid sun exposure.

The best way to prevent a sunburn is to avoid sun exposure.

Stay out of the midday sun (from 10 in the morning to 4 in the afternoon), which is the strongest sunlight. Find shade if you need to be outdoors. A shadow that is longer than you are means UV exposure is low; a shadow that is shorter than you are means the UV exposure is high.

Other ways to protect yourself from the sun include wearing protective clothing, such as:

  • Hats with wide 4 in. brims that cover your neck, ears, eyes, and scalp.
  • Sunglasses with UV protection.
  • Loose-fitting, tightly woven clothing that covers your arms and legs. Some outdoor stores may sell clothing treated with sun protection factor.

Do not use tanning booths to get a tan. Artificial tanning devices can cause skin damage and increase the risk of skin cancer.

Sunscreen protection

If you can't avoid being in the sun, use a sunscreen to help protect your skin while you are in the sun.

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